Inge Jacobsen: Hijacking the image

Inge Jacobsen: Hijacking the image

Artist Inge Jacobsen combines found advertising imagery and thread to ‘hijack’ the image and its intended message. Originally from Galway, Inge’s family moved to Denmark when she was a child. She returned to the British Isles to study Photography at Kingston University, London and has worked as a professional artist since her graduation in 2011.

Now based in Sussex, Inge has had several high profile commissions including work for renowned luxury brand Georg Jensen and more recently American Express.

In this interview with Inge she tells us why her work isn’t decorative and reflects on the importance of staying focused and being patient.

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed Beyonce Cover

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed Beyonce Cover

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed Beyonce Back Cover

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed Beyonce Back Cover

Experiences and influences

TextileArtist.org: What or who were your early influences and how has your life/upbringing influenced your work?

Inge Jacoben: My Danish Grandmother was very good at knitting and cross-stitching and taught me. Her sisters, who I never had the opportunity to meet, created some very intricate and beautiful cross-stitched piece that would later influence my work.

I was always interested in drawing and painting as a child but when my family and I moved from Ireland to Denmark I became much more focused on it. It was a way of working through the language barrier and a good way to make friends.

I was able to draw from these experiences and influences once I started university in the UK where concepts meant a lot more than aesthetics.

Inge Jacobsen – The Queen front of The Guardian – 9th May 2012

Inge Jacobsen – The Queen front of The Guardian – 9th May 2012

Inge Jacobsen – Vogue March 2011

Inge Jacobsen – Vogue March 2011

What was your route to becoming an artist?

I studied art at college and then went on to do it at a degree level. I did one year in Fine Art and two years in Photography at Kingston University in the UK.

You use a traditional technique to create very contemporary work. How did you come to use stitch in your photography work and why?

I started using it when I was in my first year at university. Before then I was very much a painter but at university I came across, and shared a studio, with some amazing painters and knew I didn’t want to be in competition with them. Also, university taught me that ideas were just as valuable as skill and thread was the best way for me to explore my ideas.

The inspiration came from a cross-stitch piece a friend had made me many years ago when I was at school.

It is a medium that still excites me now.

Inge Jacobsen – Stitched editorial

Inge Jacobsen – Stitched editorial

Inge Jacobsen – Back of stitched editorial

Inge Jacobsen – Back of stitched editorial

Stay focused and be patient

Tell us a bit about the environment you like to work in.

I like to work in my home. It’s the sort of work that traditionally was done in the home and that is something I like. I usually work with music or in silence. It is important to stay focused and patient with embroidery. It is not something that is created in a fast paced frenzy. Also, because I work on paper it is too delicate for it to be rushed.

Tell us a bit about a commission you’ve done that you’re particularly proud of.

I have done two major commissions that I am very proud of. In 2011/2012 I worked with the Danish brand Georg Jensen and re-energised their 2012 campaign. I created 4 relatively small pieces for their display and 4 very large pieces for their windows. It was non-stop cross-stitching for 3 months.

I was lucky enough to have the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court Palace help me for 2 weeks. I asked if their degree students would be interested in helping and we worked together to finish it.

Inge Jacobsen – Georg Jensen 2012 Campaign

Inge Jacobsen – Georg Jensen 2012 Campaign

Recently I did a commission for American Express. I created my own interpretations of three of their cards; the Green, Gold and Platinum card. These were used on their social media platforms.

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Gold Card

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Gold Card

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Green Card

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Green Card

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Platinum Card

Inge Jacobsen – American Express Platinum Card

What advice would you give to an aspiring artist?

Get your work out there as much as possible. Don’t be shy and believe in your work and your talent. I’m always surprised when I speak to artists that are trying to get noticed but don’t have a website – it is so important to make it as easy as possible for the right people to see your work.

Apply for group shows and competitions and utilise the internet as much as you can. Post your work/links to your work on communities that you think might be interested and don’t be afraid to email galleries/magazines and make some noise about yourself and your work. The worst thing that can happen is that they say “No”, then move on to the next.

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed cover with Thom Yorke (2013)

Inge Jacobsen – Dazed cover with Thom Yorke (2013)

Inge Jacobsen – Collaged editorial

Inge Jacobsen – Collaged editorial

The right context

What is your favourite tool, book and resource to do with your work as an artist?

Magazines are my favourite resource. I love flicking through magazines looking for an image to jump out at me that makes me want to rework it in some way.

How do you go about choosing where to show your work?

I’ve been lucky in that I have been approached by some fantastic people and galleries who have offered to show my work. I have turned shows down once or twice just because I didn’t feel that being part of those shows who send that right message of what my work is about. It’s important for me to have my work seen in the right context otherwise it can be mistaken for something decorative. There isn’t anything wrong with decorative art or craft but it’s not what my work is about and because embroidery is traditionally viewed as a hobbyist craft, it is important for me that my work isn’t labelled as such.

Inge Jacobsen – iD magazine cover

Inge Jacobsen – iD magazine cover

Inge Jacobsen – Sewn Chanel ad

Inge Jacobsen – Sewn Chanel ad

Where can readers see your work this year?

I just finished a group show in Victoria, Australia at the Town Hall Gallery in Hawthorn. It was one of their most successful exhibitions and was really well received – I am very proud to have been a part of it.

At the moment I am in talks with other galleries both nationally and internationally so for updates on where you can see my work next please visit my website and Facebook page.

For more information visit: http://www.ingejacobsen.com

If you’ve enjoyed this interview with Inge then let us know by leaving a comment below

Tuesday 16th, July 2019 / 09:20
Sam

About the author

Sam is the co-founder of TextileArtist.org and son of textile artist Sue Stone. Connect with Sam on Google+c/a>

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4 comments on “Inge Jacobsen: Hijacking the image”

  1. Anna says:

    I love Inge’s work! And great article hearing about her journey. I’m on a similar journey with my own wearable artwork. Using recycled materials and traditional hand craft techniques trying to show people it’s not just a domestic hobby! ♥ http://www.annahicks.co.nz

  2. Very moving article. It is good to see those art works and read about the artist motivations and feelings, knowing we are not on our on reacting to what happens around us. I esp am impressed with the way she uses all those `materials` . We all have to think about the
    `Everest `of papers and photos we leave behind, and should try and reuse them.
    Thank you for letting us meet this artist.
    mirjam

  3. Wonderful imaginairy work -I’m amazed. Thank you so much for doing this great job and to show fiber art on its best !

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